When should members of the Canadian Forces retain private legal counsel, and how should such counsel be employed?

When should members of the Canadian Forces retain private legal counsel, and how should such counsel be employed?

Posted February 15, 2017 Category: Businesses

This week, we continue the 3-part blog series intended to introduce the firm’s Military Administrative Law practice.  Last week’s article, which can be found through this link, described the potential pitfalls arising from the rhetoric surrounding the CF’s Operation HONOUR (Op HONOUR), and how a CF member affected by Op HONOUR-related decision-making might benefit from the counsel of a well-informed and experienced legal advisor and advocate.

The second article in the series – available through this link – discusses, more generally, the circumstances in which a CF member might benefit from the assistance of legal counsel. In particular, the article discusses the limitation of the extent to which a CF member can rely on private counsel to prohibit communication from the chain of command.  The article also describes how a serving CF member might obtain the optimum advantage from private counsel balanced against the personal expense of retaining a lawyer.

If you are a current or former member of the CF, or a member of the extended military community, and you believe your rights, interests or privileges have been adversely affected by decision-makers in the Canadian Forces, these articles will be of interest to you. If you believe that you could be assisted by legal counsel in such matters, please contact me and we can discuss your concerns.

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Posted February 15, 2017 Category: Businesses

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